Class Report: ENGL 062, 18 February 2019

After making an administrative note–student evaluations are open–discussion addressed questions from last week and earlier classes, as well as about previous work. It then moved to concerns of student writing and workshopping student papers before noting upcoming assignments, as below.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled, unchanged from last week. Two attended; student participation was reasonably good.

An online office hour will be held online on Thursday, 14 February 2019, at 1800.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 17 February 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Active Reading and Polishing Your Essay (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 7 Reading Exercise (online)
  • Week 7 Quiz (online)
  • Essay 2 Revision (due online as a Word document)
Advertisements

Class Report: ENGL 062, 11 February 2019

After addressing questions from the previous week and before, discussion returned to concerns of summary; a review seemed warranted. Discussion moved on to treat concerns of organization and of paratext after.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled, unchanged from last week. One attended; student participation was excellent.

An online office hour will be held online on Thursday, 14 February 2019, at 1800.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 17 February 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Planning & Organizing and Visual Literacy (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 6 Quiz (online)
  • Essay 2 Draft (due online as a Word document)

 

Class Report: ENGL 062, 4 February 2019

After addressing questions from the previous week and before, discussion turned to concerns of paraphrase and summary. The latter received particular attention, as it comes up in several future classes. Time was given to mechanical concerns, as well.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled, unchanged from last week. One attended; student participation was excellent.

An online office hour was held on Thursday, 31 January 2019, at 1800. None attended. The office hour that would normally take place on 7 February 2019 is cancelled; students needing assistance are encouraged to email the instructor.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 10 February 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Summary Writing and Paraphrases & Parenthetical Citations (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 5 Quiz (online)
  • Summary and Response (due online as a Word document)

This is evidently the 700th post to this webspace. Huzzah!

Class Report: ENGL 062, 28 January 2019

After addressing questions from the previous week and before, discussion turned to introductions and conclusions before moving to address concerns of revision. In-class practice was offered on the latter.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled, unchanged from last week. One attended; student participation was excellent.

An online office hour was held on Thursday, 24 January 2019, at 1800. None attended. The next will be online at 1800 on Thursday, 31 January 2019.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 3 February 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Vocabulary and Revising Essays (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 4 Quiz (online)
  • Graded Reading Activity (online)
  • Revised Essay (due online as a Word document)

Class Report: ENGL 062, 24 January 2019

The regular class meeting for the week was displaced by a holiday, so the class was given a narrated PowerPoint presentation that covered the basics of what would have been the week’s lesson. Office hours were given over to addressing student questions about and engagement with the lesson.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 2& January 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Generating Ideas and Planning Your Essay (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 3 Quiz (online)
  • Homework Submission: Essay Draft (due online as a Word document)
  • Week 3 Pulse Check (online)

Regularly scheduled class meetings and office hours resume 28 January 2019.

Class Report: ENGL 062, 14 January 2019

After addressing questions from the previous class meeting and offering an administrative note, discussion moved in sequence through concerns of definition, genre, paragraphing, and APA formatting. Time was given to upcoming assignments, and students were afforded time to work on their own responses to those assignments.

Students should note that, owing to the MLK holiday, campus will be closed on 21 January 2019. A WebEx meeting will replace the regular office hour at 1800 on 24 January 2019. This schedule supersedes and replaces that announced last week.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled, unchanged from last week. All attended; student participation was adequate.

An online office hour was held on Thursday, 10 January 2019, at 1800. None attended. The next will be online at 1800 on Thursday, 17 January 2019

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 20 January 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Trying out Transitions and Practicing Main Ideas (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 2 Quiz (online)
  • Graded Reading Activity (online)
  • Homework Submission: Developed Paragraph (due online as a Word document)
  • Week 2 Pulse Check (online)

Class Report: ENGL 062, 7 January 2019

For the first class meeting of the session, introductions were made to the discipline, course, and instructor. The materials provided in the course shell were expanded upon, assignment guidelines were reviewed, and time was afforded to students to work on their assignments.

Students should note that, owing to the MLK holiday, campus will be closed on 21 January 2019. A WebEx meeting will replace the regular class meeting on that date; it will begin at the regular class time.

The class met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 114 of the San Antonio campus. The course roster showed three students enrolled. Two attended; student participation was reasonably good.

An online office hour will be held on Thursday, 10 January 2019, at 1800.

Students are reminded that the following assignments are due before the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on 13 January 2019:

  • Discussion Threads: Introduction, Reading and Writing: My Strengths and Weaknesses, and Time Management Strategies (3 posts/thread, rubric online)
  • Week 1 Quiz (online)
  • Graded Reading Activity (online)
  • Week 1 Pulse Check (online)

Reflective Comments for the November 2018 Session at DeVry University

Continuing a practice I most recently iterated at the end of the September 2018 session at DeVry University, and following closely the patterns established in previous practice, comments below offer impressions of class performance among students enrolled in my sections of ENGL 135: Advanced Composition and ENGL 112: Composition during the November 2018 session at that institution. After a brief outline of each course and selected statistics about it, impressions and implications for further teaching are discussed.

ENGL 135

Students enrolled in ENGL 135 during the November 2018 session were asked to complete a number of assignments in quick succession. Many, and the weightiest, related to the overall course project; others were homework meant to practice skills used in the workplace and in later stages of the course project. Those assignments and their prescribed point-values are below, with relative weights shown in the figure below:

ENGL 135 Grade Breakdown November 2018

  • Course Project
    • Topic Selection, 50 points
    • Research Proposal, 50 points
    • Annotated Bibliography, 100 points
    • First Draft, 70 points
    • Second Draft, 80 points
    • Presentation, 100 points
    • Final Draft, 170 points
    • Career Planning, 50 points
  • Discussions, 280 points
  • Homework, 50 points
  • Total, 1000 points

As before, most assignments were assessed by means of rubrics provided by the institution or amended from them for ease of use. Some few were assessed on a percentile basis from standardized testing conducted as part of University-wide course requirements.

The section met online, with office hours generally taking place Monday evenings at 6pm Central time. Its overall data includes

  • End-of-term enrollment: 18
  • Average class score: 730.925/1000 (C)
    • Standard deviation: 210.112
  • Students earning a grade of A (900/1000 points or more): 5
  • Students earning a grade of F (below 600/1000 points): 3

Numbers of students receiving each of the traditional letter grades are indicated below:

ENGL 135 Students by Grade

Comments about the session will follow in Impressions and Implications, below.

Return to top.

ENGL 112

Students enrolled in ENGL 112 during the November 2018 session were also asked to complete a number of assignments in quick succession. Most concerned a series of short papers, presented in planning sheets before submission as full essays; a final essay additionally went through an intermediate draft before final submission. Those assignments and their prescribed point-values are below, with relative weights shown in the figure below:

ENGL 112 Grade Breakdown November 2018

  • Papers, 690 points
  • Discussions, 310 points
  • Total, 1000 points

Assignments were assessed by means of rubrics provided by the institution or amended from them for ease of use.

The section met in Room 111 of the San Antonio campus Wednesdays at 6pm, with office hours generally taking place Monday evenings at 6pm Central time. Its overall data includes

  • End-of-term enrollment: 9
  • Average class score: 610.9611/1000 (D)
    • Standard deviation: 299.4946
  • Students earning a grade of A (900/1000 points or more): 0
  • Students earning a grade of F (below 600/1000 points): 2

Numbers of students receiving each of the traditional letter grades are indicated below:

ENGL 112 Students by Grade

Additionally, since the class met physically, it was possible to take attendance. All students in the section missed at least one class meeting; some missed quite a few more, as indicated below (with the figure being classes missed, students missing that many classes, and percentage of students falling into that category):

ENGL 112 Students by Absence

Comments about the session will follow in Impressions and Implications, below.

Return to top.

Impressions and Implications

I confess to feeling some dismay at the lower performance of the November 2018 session against the September 2018. While ENGL 135 had more A-earning students than its earlier counterpart, it also had more students fail–and ENGL 112 had no students earn overall As, though it also had students failing. In each case, the lower grade was due to non-submission; many students got many zeros for work because they simply did not submit it. I have to wonder what else I could have done to chivvy them along.

Matters were complicated by a data loss I experienced late in the session. I typically keep my teaching notes and materials in a USB drive; the one I had been using ceased functioning. In retrospect, I had some indication that such would be the case, and I did not act upon it; I suffered as a result. Student grades were not affected; those I had recorded in the school’s system remained in place, as did my comments about them, and materials I had uploaded to this site also remained in place. Still, having to reconstruct information at the speed I did did not make things easier for me. How it affected my students is not as clear.

I feel, however, that my earlier-noted resumption of example-writing was helpful for my students. At the very least, I know that people were looking at the examples I posted; I have access to readership statistics, so that, while numbers were not as good as they were in August, they were still generally up. Enough students’ work mirrored the examples that I am confident some of the lessons made it through, which is good. Unfortunately, I am not teaching either ENGL 135 or ENGL 112 in the coming couple of sessions, so the examples will be let alone for a bit–though I mean to continue the practice with the next class I teach.

Moving forward, I also mean to follow another practice that I had in place for ENGL 135 but not ENGL 112. In my record-keeping, I more narrowly divided storage and commentary for the former than the latter; it ended up making grading easier and commentary clearer, despite having more assignments and more students in Advanced Composition than Composition. Though it requires more initial work from me, it makes for less work while I am amid work; I think I’ll continue to do it.

At the end, though, I am glad yet again to have had yet again the chance to teach, and I look forward to having it at least one more time as I move forward.

Return to top.

Initial Comments for the January 2019 Session at DeVry University

I have been offered a class for the January 2019 Session, a section of ENGL 062: Introduction to Reading & Writing, and I’ve accepted the assignment. It’s a class I’ve taught several times before, though it seems to have changed a bit for the upcoming term. (That’s good, because there were some things that needed adjusting, but it does also ask me to re-learn some things. But that’s also to the good.)

It can be a fun thing, indeed.
Image from Giphy.com.

I am likely to continue to offer samples of the work I expect my students to do, as I have noted that the students in classes where my examples are ready to hand do better on the tasks assigned them than those who were not. Too, I’ve not generated examples for the introductory students yet, and it can easily be argued that they are in the most need of additional assistance; I have been lax in not doing so previously, and I will address the lack. And it will help me negotiate the changes that have gone through since I last taught the course, which is also set to be to my benefit and my students’.

The class is set to meet in Room 111 of the San Antonio campus on Mondays at 6pm, beginning on 7 January 2019 and running through 2 March. It’s scheduled to run until close to 10, but how much of that gets taken up will depend on enrollment; keeping two students in for four hours is a bit much. And I will have to negotiate the MLK holiday, which will interfere with the class meeting. But that will be a relatively minor challenge–I already have plans in mind for how to proceed–and I am happy to be once again in a position to face it, to do again what I have long done and even longer trained to do.

Class Report: ENGL 112, 19 December 2018

Class was given over entirely to the completion of eighth-week work: student evaluations (if not yet done) and the reflective postscript. It met as scheduled, at 1800 in Room 106 of the San Antonio campus. The class roster listed nine students enrolled, a decline of one from last week; four attended. Student participation was reasonably good. An online office hour was held on 17 December 2018; no students attended.

Students are reminded that the reflective postscript is due online as a Word document no later than the end of day (Mountain Standard Time) on Saturday, 22 December 2018. The session closes at that time, so no late submissions can be accepted.

Reflective comments are forthcoming.